Getting (and Staying) Organized

During the past year-and-a-half as a software development manager for a local consulting firm, I’ve tried a number of different tools and techniques to keep me organized.  As my role expanded to include business development, hiring, and project management tasks, there’s been a lot more to keep track of.  I meet weekly or twice-monthly 1-on-1 with each team member on my current project.  “Move it out of e-mail” is my primary objective for getting organized.  The rest of this post will elaborate on the specific alternatives to e-mail that I tried on the way to my current “manager tools”.
Outlook
Beyond e-mail and calendar functionality, Outlook offers a To-Do List and Tasks for keeping organized.  Both provide start dates and due dates.  The To-Do List is tied directly to individual e-mails, while Tasks are stand-alone items.  I abandoned the use of task functionality pretty quickly.  I used the To-Do List as recently as July of this year, but I see it as a bad habit now.  I rarely end up clearly the various options to flag an e-mail for follow-up (Today, Tomorrow, This Week, Next Week, No Date & Custom), so they become an ever-growing list where I only very occasionally mark items as complete.  In addition, the search functionality in Outlook never works as well as I need it to when I’m trying to find something.
Lighthouse
Once I passed the six month mark with my employer, I felt comfortable enough to introduce weekly 1-on-1s as a practice on my project.  After a couple of weeks of filling out a paper template from these guys for each team member on my project, the need for a better solution became readily apparent.  Lighthouse is the name of the company and their product, a web-based application for managing your 1-on-1s with staff.  After the free trial, I chose not to renew.  While I like Lighthouse, and the cost wasn’t prohibitive, my employer wasn’t going to pay for it.
I liked the ideas in Lighthouse enough that I tried to build a simpler, custom version of it myself.  Increasing work responsibilities (and the birth of my twins, Elliott and Emily) erased the free time I had for that side project.  Lighthouse maintains a leadership and management blog that I’ve found to be worthwhile reading.
Trello
I first started using Trello years ago for something not at all related to work–requesting bug fixes and enhancements to a custom website my fantasy football league uses.  I didn’t consider using it for work until I was re-introduced to it by a VP who uses it to keep himself organized.  Once I reviewed a few example boards and set up a board to moderate weekly business development meeting, new possibilities for its use revealed themselves very quickly.  As of today, I’ve got 4 different boards active: 1 for “hiring funnel” activities, another board for business development tasks, a 3rd for project-specific tasks that don’t fall into a current Scrum sprint, and a 4th board as a general to-do list.  The last board turned out to be a great solution for capturing information from my 1-on-1 meetings.  It also tracks my progress toward annual goals, training reminders, and other “good corporate citizen” tasks.
The free tier of Trello service offers the functionality that matters most:
  • create multiple boards
  • define workflows as simple or complex as you need
  • create cards as simple or complex as you need
Markdown formatting, attachment support, due dates, checklists, archiving, the ability to subscribe to individual cards, lists and/or boards and collaborate with other team members of Trello combined with the key functionality above has helped me become much better organized and able to communicate more consistently with my team members and executives in my organization.  The search capability works much better for me than Outlook as well.
I’ve only gotten a handful of co-workers in my organization to adopt Trello so far, but I keep recommending it to other co-workers.  I’d like to see our entire business unit adopt it officially so we can take advantage of the capabilities available at the Business Class tier.

Security Breaches and Two-Factor Authentication

It seems the news has been rife with stories of security breaches lately.  As a past and present federal contractor, the OPM breach impacted me directly.  That and one other breach impacted my current client.  The lessons I took from these and earlier breaches were: Use a password manager Enable 2-factor authentication wherever it’s offered […]


Bulging Laptop Battery

Until yesterday, I’d been unaware that laptop batteries could fail in a way other than not holding a charge very well. According to the nice fellow at an Apple Genius Bar near my office, this happens occasionally.  I wish I’d been aware of it sooner, so I might have gotten it replaced before AppleCare expired. […]


Which Programming Language(s) Should I Learn?

I had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine (a computer science professor) and one of his students last week.  Beyond the basic which language(s) question were a couple more intriguing ones: If you had to do it all over again, would you still stuck with the Microsoft platform for your entire development career? […]


Reflection and Unit Testing

This post is prompted by a couple of things: (1) a limitation in the Moq mocking framework, (2) a look back at a unit test I wrote nearly 3 years ago when I first arrived at my current company. While you can use Moq to create an instance of a concrete class, you can’t set […]


Pseudo-random Sampling and .NET

One of the requirements I received for my current application was to select five percent of entities generated by another process for further review by an actual person. The requirement wasn’t quite a request for a simple random sample (since the process generates entities one at a time instead of in batches), so the code I […]


RadioButtonListFor and jQuery

One requirement I received for a recent ASP.NET MVC form implementation was that particular radio buttons be checked on the basis of other radio buttons being checked. Because it’s a relatively simple form, I opted to fulfill the requirement with just jQuery instead of adding knockout.js as a dependency. Our HTML helper for radio button […]


Complex Object Model Binding in ASP.NET MVC

In the weeks since my last post, I’ve been doing more client-side work and re-acquainting myself with ASP.NET MVC model binding.  The default model binder in ASP.NET MVC works extremely well.  In the applications I’ve worked on over the past 2 1/2 years, there have been maybe a couple of instances where the default model binder […]


XUnit: Beyond the Fact Attribute (Part 2)

One thing I initially missed about NUnit compared to XUnit (besides built-in support for it in tools like TeamCity) is attributes like SetUp and TestFixtureSetUp that enable you to decorate a method with variables that need to be set (or any other logic that needs to run) before each test or before all the tests in […]


Everyone is Junior at Something–Even You

Hanselminutes #427  was an excellent interview with Jonathan Barronville, the author (perhaps the most intelligent and articulate 19-year-old I’ve ever heard) of this article on Medium.  The discussion covered a lot of ground, and posed a number of thought-provoking questions.  Three of the questions struck me as especially important. What is senior? In the podcast, […]